When you are in pain or suffering from illness, your environment can play a huge role in how you heal and your ability to cope on a daily basis. Want proof? Just ask these folks…

In an area of architecture that has very demanding functionality requirements and little creative freedom, Tsoi/Kobus & Associates (TK&A Architects) has become a leader over the past 30 years in designing spaces that provide the optimum patient experience in healthcare facilities around the world.  We recently caught up with TK&A and asked how the principles used in designing hospital, clinic and other healthcare facilities could be applied to the homes of our readers. Senior Interior Architect Chu Foxlin, AIA, IIDA, LEED BD+C , shared so many ideas that we worried about enough space to include everything! Foxlin explained that the underlying principles of design are the same…whether one is building a multi-million dollar hospital or designing the best bedroom space for a migraine sufferer.

Space Planning

An easily understandable space = a calm space. To get the calm and soothing environment desired by most pain sufferers, start by making sure the space is not confusing or frustrating – with the size, shape and edge of the space clearly defined.

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Natural Light

Scientific evidence proves that natural light can aid in healing, so use as much of it as possible. When you have enough natural light, you’ll need less artificial light.

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Noise/Sound Levels

As with light, studies show how the noise level affects the healing rates in patients. In hospitals that TK&A designs, overhead announcements are discouraged or even completely removed.

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Sustainable Interior Finishes

To create a healthy interior, the air indoors must be healthy. What you choose to put in your house can have a major impact – and it is easier in a home to get fairly clean air than a large hospital.

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Color

While subjective, research shows that colors invoke feelings. So use colors in your home that invoke the feelings of calm that pain sufferers desire.

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Let us know if you’ve already employed some of these design techniques – and how it has helped you!

Duke Atrium –A welcoming and clearly defined public lobby leading to a multi-level atrium with an iconic feature wall lit by skylight forms the landmark of the public activity.

SPACE PLANNING:  Duke Atrium –A welcoming and clearly defined public lobby leading to a multi-level atrium with an iconic feature wall lit by skylight forms the landmark of the public activity.  Photo credit:  Robert Benson Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amplatz Patient Room- Large window in the patient room allows plenty of natural light and direct view to outside from patient bed. All windows are equipped with sun-screening shade and room-darkening shade.

COLOR:  The Lobby and the children’s reading room “cone” at Amplatz Children’s Hospital. The patients at the hospital prefer cheerful bright colors to primary colors, contrary to common belief.  Photo credit:  Nick Merrick of Heddrich Blessing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COLOR: MEEI corridor view with wall graphic- At this facility TK&A designed for Mass Eye and Ear, most walls are painted with light neutral color, with relatively saturated accent color to help visually impaired to differentiate different side corridors.

COLOR: MEEI corridor view with wall graphic- At this facility TK&A designed for Mass Eye and Ear, most walls are painted with light neutral color, with relatively saturated accent color to help visually impaired to differentiate different side corridors.  Photo credit:  Bruce T. Martin Photography